warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home2/curricu2/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Earth

Weather and Climate Conceptual Strand Map

This draft map, developed for the second edition of the Atlas of Science Literacy, is used with Section IV. This map is currently in draft form. If you would like to give Project 2061 feedback on this draft map, Click here

Bibliographic Citation: 
AAAS/Project 2061 (2005) Draft Atlas Maps- Weather and Climate. http://www.project2061.org/publications/atlas/vol2/4b_climate.pdf

The Impact of a Science Demonstration on Children's Understandings of Air Pressure

This article can be used with CTS sections II and IV to learn more about how demonstrations impact students' preconceptions about air pressure.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Shepardson, D., Moje, E., and Kennard-McClelland, A. (1994). The Impact of a Science Demonstration on Children's Understandings of Air Pressure Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Vol 31(3), pp 243-258.

Seasons of the Year

This site can be used with Section I to help teachers build an understanding of the complex relationship between the motion and position of the earth, in relation to light from the sun, in order to understand the concept of seasons.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Dr. David Stearns, NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center (2004). Seasons of the Year (from Stargazers to Starships Web Site). <http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/stargaze/Sseason.htm>

Preservice Elementary Teachers Conceptions of the Causes of Seasons

As a supplement to Section IV, this article can be used to show that elementary teachers may enter science teaching with similar alternative conceptions that their students hold related to the topic of the seasons.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Atwood, R. and Atwood, V. (1996). Preservice teachers conceptions of the causes of seasons. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 33(5): 553-563.

Mountaintop Fossil

This assessment probe can be used with CTS Section IV. This probe targets student ideas related to changes in the surface of the earth. The probe can be used to examine student work related to the idea that marine fossils found on top of tall mountains can be explained by earth processes. In addition, the teacher notes provide further information for CTS Sections II, III, and IV.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Keeley, P., Eberle, F., and Tugel, J. (2007). Uncovering student ideas in science-25 more formative assessment probes. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press (available at nsta.org; also available through amazon.com).

Is It a Rock? (Version 1) and Is It a Rock? (Version 2)

This assessment probe can be used with CTS Section IV. This probe targets student ideas related to rocks. The probe can be used to examine student work related to common misunderstandings about a conception of what a rock is. In addition, the teacher notes provide further information for CTS Sections II, III, and IV.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Keeley, P., Eberle, F., and Tugel, J. (2007). Uncovering student ideas in science-25 more formative assessment probes. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press (available at nsta.org; also available through amazon.com).

Investigating Students' Ideas about Plate Tectonics

This article can be used as a supplement to CTS Section II and IV. The authors describe the beliefs middle school students bring to their learning about ideas related to plate tectonics and the implications for instruction. The article includes a detailed list of related plate tectonics misconceptions including commonly held ideas about plates, plate movement and plate interactions, events and features resulting from plate interactions, and recycling of plate material. Strategies for moving students beyond ther misconceptions are also described.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Ford, B. and Taylor, M. (2006). Investigating Students' Ideas about Plate Tectonics. Science Scope. Vol 30(1). pp 38-41. (note: NSTA members can access this article on line through the NSTA Journal Archives at nsta.org)

Growing Pebbles and Conceptual Prisms- Understanding the Source of Student Misconceptions about Rock Formations

This article can be used to supplement CTS Section IV. It describes a number of misconceptions about how rocks form.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Kusnick, J. (2002). Growing Pebbles and Conceptual Prisms- Understanding the Source of STudent Misconceptions about Rock Formations. Journal of Geoscience Education.50(1). p 31-39. <http://www.nagt.org/files/nagt/jge/abstracts/Kusnick_v50n1p31.pdf>

Earth's Solid Membrane: Soil

This video can be used with CTS Section I to improve teachers' content understanding. Soil scientists describe the nature of soil and the physical and chemical processes involved in its formation. The video can also be used with Section IV as children are interviewed throughout the video on their ideas about soil. The print materials that go with the video include a set of questions that can be used to elicit commonly held ideas.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Session 1- Earth's Solid Membrane: Soil, from the Annenberg Series: Essential Science for Teachers: Earth and Space Science <http://www.learner.org/resources/series195.html>

Deep Time Framework: A Preliminary Study of U.K. Primary Teachers' Conceptions of Geological Time and Perceptions of Geoscience.

While this paper focuses on teachers' conceptions, it is useful with CTS section IV in learning about the difficulties both students and adults have in conceptualizing vast spans of time, including pivotal geologic occurances.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Trend, R. (2001). Deep Time Framework: A Preliminary Study of U.K. Primary Teachers' Conceptions of Geological Time and Perceptions of Geoscience. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Vol 38(2). Pp 191-221.
Syndicate content