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Matter

What Is in the Bubbles?

This assessment probe can be used with CTS Section IV.The probe targets student ideas related to particles in the context of a change in state. The probe can be used to examine student work related to the topic study. In addition, the teacher notes provide further information for CTS Sections II, III, and IV.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Keeley, P., Eberle, F., and Tugel, J. (2007). Uncovering student ideas in science-25 more formative assessment probes. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press (available at nsta.org; also available through amazon.com).

Students' Representations and Explanations of Dissolving in Regard to Interactions of Molecules

This resource can be used with CTS Section IV (grades 8 and above) to examine research findings about students' understanding of dissolving from a macro to micro level.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Concord Consortium (2006). Students' Representations and Explanations of Dissolving in Regard to Interactions of Molecules. The Molecular Workbench- Research Results at http://workbench.concord.org/research/results/spec_analysis_dis1.html

Students Understanding of Chemical Bonds and the Energetics of Chemcal Reactions

This supplement to Section IV investigates 12th grade students understandings of the nature of chemical bonds and energy chages across familiar chemical reactions following instruction.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Boo, H. (1998). Students understanding of chemical bonds and the energetics of chemcal reactions. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 35(5): 569-581.

Student Understanding of the Volume, Mass, and Pressure of Air within a Sealed Syringe in Different States of Compression

This supplement to Section IV addresses difficulties students have understanding qualitative and quantitative pressure and volume relationships of air within a sealed syringe in different states of compression in a task related to Boyles Law.

Bibliographic Citation: 
De Berg, K. (1995). Student understanding of the volume, mass, and pressure of air within a sealed syringe in different states of compression. Journal of Research in Science Teching. 32(8). 871-884.

K-8 Learning Progression for Matter and the Atomic-Molecular Theory

This supplement provides a research-based learning progression that describes a coherent sequence of core ideas about matter, including particulate matter. It can be used with CTS Sections II, III, IV, and V to explore how empirically-tested concepts/ideas that lead to an understanding of Atomic-Molecular Theory build over a K-8 sequence. In addition, the publication (which can be read on line) describes this particular learning progression, the core tenets of atomic molecular theory, and implications for classroom instruction on pages 226-249.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Appendix A: http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11625&page=360 In Duschl, R., Schweingruber, H., and Shouse, A., Eds. (2007). Taking Science to School. Washington DC. National Academy Press.

Introduction to Chemistry- Lecture 21

This 30 min DVD clip can be used as a supplement to Section I (and a companion to Science Matters) to enhance content knowledge. Dr. Hazen, co-author of Science Matters, provides a clear, concise lecture, with visuals, examples, and rich analogies, on atomic bonding. The DVD clip emphasizes the main principle that electrons rearrange to form chemical bonds.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Hazen, R. (2001). "Lecture 21- Introduction to Chemistry" in The Joy of Science- Part 2 of the Great Courses Series. Chantilly, VA: The Teaching Company. For ordering info: http://www.teach12.com/

Images of Atoms

This online article can be used with Section II and IV to examine the difficulties and misconceptions students have picturing atoms and molecules. The article discusses use of a "fuzzy ball" representation at the middle and high school level to help students develop more accurate conceptions of the structure of atoms and molecules. Alternative representations are reviewed and discussed for their potential to lead to misconceptions about atoms.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Wright, T. (2005) Images of Atoms Submitted to School Science Lessons, Queensland, Australia. To access complete article <http://www.uq.edu.au/_School_Science_Lessons/TWImagesatoms.html>

Ice Cubes in a Bag; Lemonade; Cookie Crumbles; and Seedlings in a Jar

These assessment probes can be used with CTS Section IV.These probes target student ideas related to conservation of matter. The probes can be used to examine student work related to conservation of matter ideas in a variety of contexts including closed systems, change in state, dissolving, breaking objects into smaller parts, and a biological transformation of matter. In addition, the teacher notes provide further information for CTS Sections II, III, and IV.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Keeley, P., Eberle, F., and Farrin, L.. (2005). Uncovering student ideas in science-25 formative assessment probes. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press (available at nsta.org; also available through amazon.com).

How Students (Mis-)Understand Science and Mathematics

This book is a nice supplement to CTS Section IV. Intuitive rules students use to reason conservation-related phenomena are described in detail as well as several example tasks used to elicit student thinking.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Stavy, R. and Tirosh, D. (2000). How Students (Mis-)Understand Science and Mathematics. NY, NY: Teachers College Press.

Floating Logs, Solids and Holes

These assessment probes can be used with CTS Section IV.These probes target student ideas related to density. The probes can be used to examine student work related to the Density topic study. In addition, the teacher notes provide further information for CTS Sections II, III, and IV.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Keeley, P., Eberle, F., and Tugel, J. (2007). Uncovering student ideas in science-25 more formative assessment probes. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press (available at nsta.org; also available through amazon.com).
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