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Journal Article

Intermediate Children's Ideas About the Things They Have in Their Bodies

This article can be used with CTS sections II and III. It is about a study conducted with upper elementary students in New Zealand that examined children's ideas about what was inside of their bodies.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Osborne, R. and Freyberg, P. (1985).Intermediate Children's Ideas About the Things They Have in Their Bodies- from an unpublished manuscript accessed online at <http://www.mmsa.org/>

Identifying Patterns and Relationships among the Responses of Seventh Grade Students to the Science Process Skill of Designing Experiments

Section II and IV supplement. This study examines the factors that may be related to students ability to s uccessfully design experiments. Results indicate that explicit, incremental development of the skills of formulating hypotheses and identfying variables is needed for student success.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Germann, P., Aram, R., and Burke, G. (1996). Identifying patterns and relationships among the responses of seventh grade students to the science process skill of designing experiments. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 33(1): 79-99.

Identifying a Baseline for Teachers Astronomy Content Knowledge

This article connects to Section I by describing content teachers need to know to teach astronomy well. The paper describes the ADT (Astronomy Diagnostic Test). This resource may be useful when discussing what adult knowledge teachers must have in order to teach astronomy concepts in the standards.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Brunsell, E., and Marcks, J. (2005). "Identifying a Baseline for Teachers Astronomy Content Knowledge" in Astronomy Education Review 3(2) Also online at: http://aer.noao.edu/AERArticle.php?issue=6&section=2&article=3

Growing Pebbles and Conceptual Prisms- Understanding the Source of Student Misconceptions about Rock Formations

This article can be used to supplement CTS Section IV. It describes a number of misconceptions about how rocks form.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Kusnick, J. (2002). Growing Pebbles and Conceptual Prisms- Understanding the Source of STudent Misconceptions about Rock Formations. Journal of Geoscience Education.50(1). p 31-39. <http://www.nagt.org/files/nagt/jge/abstracts/Kusnick_v50n1p31.pdf>

Elementary School Children's Beliefs About Matter

This paper can be used with CTS section IV to learn more about young children's (ages 7-10) conceptions of matter, both micro and macroscopic.

Bibliographic Citation: 
This paper can be used with CTS section IV to learn more about young children's (ages 7-10) conceptions of matter, both micro and macroscopic.

Density on Dry Land

Article describes how density misconceptions may arise from buoyancy experiences. Useful with sections II and IV.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Libarkin, J., Crockett, C., and Sadler, P. (2003). Density on dry land. The Science Teacher.Sept Issue:46-50.

Deep Time Framework: A Preliminary Study of U.K. Primary Teachers' Conceptions of Geological Time and Perceptions of Geoscience.

While this paper focuses on teachers' conceptions, it is useful with CTS section IV in learning about the difficulties both students and adults have in conceptualizing vast spans of time, including pivotal geologic occurances.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Trend, R. (2001). Deep Time Framework: A Preliminary Study of U.K. Primary Teachers' Conceptions of Geological Time and Perceptions of Geoscience. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Vol 38(2). Pp 191-221.

Circus of Light

Could be used with Section II to examine some instructional activities that challenge students thinking about the nature of light.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Matkins,J and McDonough,J (2004). Circus of light. Science and Children February Issue: 50-54.

Childrens Misconceptions about Weather: A Review of the Literature

Supplement to Section IV- This paper reports a synthesis of the existing research about childrens misconceptions relating to weather, climate, and atmosphere.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Paper presented at the NARST annual meeting, New Orleans, LA, April 29, 2000. <http://www.csulb.edu/~lhenriqu/NARST2000.htm>

Changing Ideas about the Periodic Table of Elements and Students Alternative Concepts of Isotopes and Allotropes

Supplement to Section IV: This study examined high school students alternative conceptions of atoms, isotopes, and allotropes and how they link these concepts to the Periodic Table.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Schmidt, H., Baumgartner, T., and Eybe, H. (2003). Changing Ideas about the Periodic Table of Elements and Students Alternative Concepts of Isotopes and Allotropes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 40(3): 257-277.
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