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Seasons

Learning About Seasons: A Guide for Teachers and Curriculum Developers

This paper describes findings from 41 studies illustrating why the concept of seasons is difficult to learn. The article is a nice supplement to CTS Sections II, III, and IV. IT also proposes a K-12 learning progression that can be used with CTS Section V that also shows the connections between global climate zones, behavior of light, and a model of Earth in space.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Sneider, C., Bar, V., and Kavanaugh, C. (2011). Learning about seasons: A guide for teachers and curriculum developers. Astronomy Education Review. Vol 10. Issue 1. http://aer.aas.org/resource/1/aerscz/v10/i1/p010103_s1

Seasons of the Year

This site can be used with Section I to help teachers build an understanding of the complex relationship between the motion and position of the earth, in relation to light from the sun, in order to understand the concept of seasons.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Dr. David Stearns, NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center (2004). Seasons of the Year (from Stargazers to Starships Web Site). <http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/stargaze/Sseason.htm>

Preservice Elementary Teachers Conceptions of the Causes of Seasons

As a supplement to Section IV, this article can be used to show that elementary teachers may enter science teaching with similar alternative conceptions that their students hold related to the topic of the seasons.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Atwood, R. and Atwood, V. (1996). Preservice teachers conceptions of the causes of seasons. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 33(5): 553-563.

Childrens Misconceptions about Weather- A Review of the Literature

This paper can be used with CTS Section IV to examine students commonly held ideas about air, atmosphere, clouds, water cycle, seasons, and Earths heating.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association of Research in Science Teaching, New Orleans, LA, April 29, 2000. <http://www.curriculumtopicstudy.org/%5C%22http://www.csulb.edu/~lhenriqu/NARST2000.htm%5C%22>

Childrens Misconceptions about Weather- A Review of the Literature

This paper can be used with CTS Section IV to examine students commonly held ideas about air, atmosphere, clouds, water cycle, seasons, and Earths heating.

Bibliographic Citation: 
Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association of Research in Science Teaching, New Orleans, LA, April 29, 2000.
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